Tuesday, July 22, 2014

cross-connect:

Artist Samantha Keely Smith paints breathtaking abstract landscapes that resemble the swirling waters of the ocean. Using oil paint, enamel, and shellac, Smith builds up multiple translucent layers of color, alternating between soft brushstrokes and large, sweeping gestures to evoke crashing waves, surging tides, and stormy floods.

Via 

// Selected by Sunil

So you plant your own garden and
decorate your own soul, instead of waiting
for someone to bring you flowers
 Jorge Luis Borges, “After a While” (translated by Veronica A. Shofstall)

(Source: feellng)

No, the object of government is not to change men from rational beings into beasts or puppets, but to enable them to develop their minds and bodies in security, and to employ their reason unshackled; neither showing hatred, anger, or deceit, nor watched with the eyes of jealousy and injustice. In fact, the true aim of government is liberty. Baruch Spinoza (via philosophy-quotes)
chicagotribune:

West Side street renamed in honor of Nelson Mandela
Friday would have Nelson Mandela’s 96th birthday.
Gov. Pat Quinn took part in a ceremony to name a West Side street in honor of the South African leader.

chicagotribune:

West Side street renamed in honor of Nelson Mandela

Friday would have Nelson Mandela’s 96th birthday.

Gov. Pat Quinn took part in a ceremony to name a West Side street in honor of the South African leader.

book-pause:

Lippincott / Reading Chair

book-pause:

Lippincott / Reading Chair

(Source: flickr.com)

yearningforunity:

Saya: Dance and Survival in an Afro-Bolivian Village

In the heartland of Bolivia, slavery and liberation are matters of living memory. African descendants worked as slaves until 1952, when slavery was abolished. Despite their being in the area for over 500 years, the national census doesn’t acknowledge their existence. They struggle for cultural survival maintaining their identity when they perform the “Saya” a dance rooted in their African heritage.

yearningforunity:

Saya: Dance and Survival in an Afro-Bolivian Village

In the heartland of Bolivia, slavery and liberation are matters of living memory. African descendants worked as slaves until 1952, when slavery was abolished. Despite their being in the area for over 500 years, the national census doesn’t acknowledge their existence. They struggle for cultural survival maintaining their identity when they perform the “Saya” a dance rooted in their African heritage.

seethes:

Mt Fuji sunsets;

Yuga Kurita

(Source: softwaring)

Sunday, July 20, 2014
ebookfriendly:

A book tree in one of the bookshops in Italy / Galina Egorova http://ebks.to/1iDqO04

ebookfriendly:

A book tree in one of the bookshops in Italy / Galina Egorova http://ebks.to/1iDqO04