Tuesday, September 2, 2014

hanecdote:

I’d like to take some time to talk about a couple things that are very close to my heart; Hanecdote and depression, When I launched the Ghoul Guide patches in June 2013 I had no ideas of the positivity they would spread across the world. They opened up a whole new platform for me to voice my beliefs in feminism and my experiences with depression and solidarity with mental health sufferers.

I’m writing this because I want to make people happy; I want to encourage people to love and be kind to themselves. I created a series of reward patches called ‘Little Victories; for that exact purpose, to give yourself a pat on the back for doing the little things which are so difficult for people who suffer with depression and anxiety. To buy for yourself as a “well done” or as a sign of support for a friend in a dark place; these patches serve multiple purposes. When I get feedback from my customers and followers my heart fills with joy knowing that I have impacted on someone’s mood as well as helping them on their own journey to happiness and self love.

I also just released a series called ‘Positivity Patches’ which is exactly what it says on the label. The aims of these patches are to spread a bit of brightness on an otherwise gloomy day whether that’s a message to yourself or those around you. I’ve suffered with depression since I was 14 and my experiences with it have deeply affected who I am and how I look at life. Depression affects so many people’s lives, not just the person suffering. It can feel like no one cares or that you’d be better off dead or like you’re a burden.

It’s a horrible lonely existence at worst and an emotionally draining burden at best. Suicide attempts, self harm and severe mood swings put my life on hold and prevented me from going to school properly. But despite that, I managed to get a BTEC Level 3 in Art and Design with only two GCSE’s and I’m now at university studying what I love. I still struggle everyday but if I can inspire and encourage someone else to keep going, I think I’ll be ok.

I like to think I am making a difference by producing these patches for people like me who need positive reinforcement. When I post my ‘Don’t Give Up’ patch on instagram and get comments like “I needed this <3” and “Thank you” all the late nights sewing have been worth it and even a small amount of sadness goes away for a while, knowing I’ve helped someone else. I hope I get to do this for a long time because it is the most rewarding thing I’ve ever achieved and it keeps me alive. Hanecdote’s prosperity and support keeps me alive and smiling even when my depression wants me curled up in bed. Thank you. 

igrimaldi:

untitled on Flickr.
Now I’m ready for autumn.

igrimaldi:

untitled on Flickr.

Now I’m ready for autumn.

Don’t ever take a fence down until you know why it was put up. Robert Frost (via hqlines)
tgieph:

I’ve had like no success on Tinder so let’s see how I do if I’m a burrito instead

tgieph:

I’ve had like no success on Tinder so let’s see how I do if I’m a burrito instead

Monday, September 1, 2014
Given the timeline and the league’s hesitence to take action, it’s hard to tell whether the NFL took a stand against domestic violence or was simply left with no alternative from a public-relations standpoint? The NFL has tightened its domestic abuse policy — but is it too little, too late?  (via micdotcom)
humansofnewyork:

"My father left for war in 1992, and never came home. Our mother didn’t tell us he was dead for a long time. We just thought he was still fighting. But one day we were being extremely difficult, and she started crying, and said: "Please behave. I’m a single mother now. So I’m going to need you’re help."(Juba, South Sudan)

humansofnewyork:

"My father left for war in 1992, and never came home. Our mother didn’t tell us he was dead for a long time. We just thought he was still fighting. But one day we were being extremely difficult, and she started crying, and said: "Please behave. I’m a single mother now. So I’m going to need you’re help."

(Juba, South Sudan)

Change the way you look at things and the things you look at change. Wayne W. Dyer (via hqlines)

theawkwardlifeofapsycho:

Why is this not taught universally.

(Source: sfgifs)

Some people read palms to tell your future. I read hands to tell your past. Each scar marks a story worth telling. Each callused palm, each cracked knuckle, is a broken bottle, a missed punch, a rusty nail, years in a factory. No Matter the Wreckage, Sarah Kay (via check-your-pockets-chimney-child)